May Newsletter Print

President's Report

Greetings,

 

We are now in the month of May! This marks the end of our fiscal year for ASPE meetings. Please join us for our last meeting this Month on May 23, where we will have a presentation by one of our board members, Michael Curtright! It should be a good one from what I have heard in the past! The topic will be relevant to what we, as plumbing engineers and designers do. From this presentation we will find out what role the Energy Code plays in plumbing design. Be sure to sign up for this meeting!

 

Just before the presentation, we will have a short ceremony of the election and swearing in of the new board members for the next two-year term. Most of the board members have volunteered to continue in their present positions. There will be some minor shuffling around with David Price taking on the Treasurer’s position, an arduous job to say the least. The treasurer’s position brings back fond memories since that is where I started. We might see a new face on the board as well. We promise this won’t take long!

 

I would like to thank the current board members for their efforts in the past two years which have contributed greatly to our growth and financial security. Thank you very much board, it has been a great year!

 

Now let’s focus on the current problems at hand. You would think we would not have any problems with the economy going strong and plenty jobs for everyone. But we do have problems here in Seattle resulting from too much growth. The homeless. It’s beginning to look like a third world country on the side of the freeways! I haven’t seen this kind of situation in the rest of the civilized world. Visitors from abroad come here and say, “Sure is a lot of poverty for such a rich country!” It’s getting to be embarrassing. It reminds me of Manila, where I travel frequently. In Manila, squatters are usually allowed to stay on public lands or undeveloped land owned by private individuals. When the developer gets ready to build, then the whole mess of humanity is forced to move elsewhere. We are starting to see the same thing here in Seattle.

 

I keep wondering what can we as plumbing engineers and designers do to help the homeless? One of their basic needs is shelter, bathrooms and food. We can help with the bathrooms. There really should be more public bathrooms around. Wherever there are tent encampments, safe parking zones, and tiny houses, there should also be portable bathroom “pods”. We all know a toilet doesn’t cost much. But hooking it up to public facilities is what costs a small fortune. But it doesn’t have to be, if the city has the will to cut through the red tape to provide temporary relief. The water can be hooked up to a public fire hydrant. A 1” tap is all we need for 3 or 4 bathrooms. Obviously if there is a fire, the pod would be evacuated and disconnected from the fire hydrant. The waste line can be dropped into a storm drain. Most of the city has a combined storm and sewer system anyway so it all goes to sewage treatment plant. Electricity is everywhere so that is not a problem for lights and hot water. The city would pay the homeless to clean up their own bathrooms. I know this sounds simplistic and utopian, but we need some basic human services for homeless. This is my plumbing design on a napkin. What’s yours?

 

 

Frank van der Harst

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MIFAB

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Membership report

Well, Spring is finally here.  The grass is growing, the flowers are in bloom, and the air is full of pollen.

 

A big thank goes out to Gregg Vlahakis, the National Technical Representative with the Viking Corporation, for his presentation on Sprinklers Used in Storage Occupancies. Even though our group was smaller than usual, the presentation was insightful and generated several questions.  Thanks again Gregg for your contribution to the Seattle ASPE chapter.

 

We have one new member joining the Seattle chapter this past month.  Daniel Cliney, with HV Engineering, has decided to join the group.  Daniel has been a fairly regular attendee to the monthly meetings, so many of you probably have already met him.  If you haven’t yet met Daniel, please go out of your way to introduce yourself and welcome him to the club.

 

The following members are celebrating anniversaries with ASPE this month:

  • Peter Hague        2 years
  • Steve Reigh         2 years
  • Joseph Seufert    8 years
  • Emily Strobridge  3 years
  • Larry Swartz        7 years
  • Beth West          16 years

  

Congratulations to each of you.

 

Continue to bear with us as we are still working the bugs out with our new SeattleASPE.net website.  If you run into an issue.  Please feel free to let me know what you’re struggling with.

 

Our annual golf tournament is coming up July 27th at Willows Run golf course.  Mark your calendars.  We should have registration up in a week or so on the website.

 

If you’re not already a member, please consider joining the Seattle chapter.  This is a great venue to network with other engineers and vendors.

 

Gary Fox – VP Membership

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Columbia Hydronics

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Legislative Report

VICE-PRESIDENT, LEGISLATIVE REPORT, MAY 2018  

SPECIAL FEATURE   

SPECIAL WASHINGTON STATE LEGISLATIVE REPORT; A DEVELOPING STORY: HB2327-2017/18

The status of the bill at the time of our publication is as follows:


PMI RELEASES LEGIONELLA EDUCATIONAL MATERIAL

Plumbing Manufacturers International released its ‘Just the Facts’ material covering Legionella and Legionella prevention. The material is available as a PDF and at www.safeplumbing.org/health-safety/legionella-and-water-supply-systems.

“We view this as a public industry service,” PMI Executive Director and CEO Kerry Stackpole said. “Our goal is to help people understand the actions to take.”

 "LEGIONELLA CAUSES THE HIGHEST HEALTH BURDEN OF ALL WATERBORNE PATHOGENS."

– WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION, 11 SEPTEMBER 2017

Four Recent Legionnaires' Disease Outbreaks reported:

  1. Hospital Plumbing System Blamed for 13 Cases. Health officials said a Lisbon hospital's domestic water system was the most likely source of Legionella that caused infections in 9 women and 4 men in late January 2018, 3 of whom were still in intensive care when the outbreak was reported.
  2. 13 Cases in Sarasota County, Florida. Florida health officials investigated Legionnaires' disease diagnosed in late February 2018 in approximately 13 people, all of whom had been in the spa and pool area of a single-family home community in North Port (Sarasota County). Although the investigators found Legionella in the water heater for the pool area fitness center, but not in the pool or spa, they suspected the pool or spa as the more likely source, probably because Legionella tests had not been conducted prior to disinfection.
  3. San Antonio Building Evacuated After Legionnaires' Identified. A staff member at Brooke Army Medical Center in San Antonio was diagnosed with Legionnaires' disease on February 6, 2018. Based on the Texas Department of State Health Services "Emerging and Acute Infectious ‎Disease Guidelines" the case was considered part of an outbreak that affected two other staff members last summer. After identifying a water heater as the suspected source, the building in which it was located was evacuated.
  4. 3 Cases Near Sydney, Australia. Onset of Legionnaires' symptoms occurred around the same time, between February 3 and 5, 2018, for three men who spent time in the Castle Hill area (near Sydney). News reports indicated that the health officials focused their investigation on cooling towers in the area.

EPA FUNDING TWO STUDIES MEASURING POTENTIAL LINK BETWEEN LOW FLOW RATES AND WATERBORNE DISEASE

The US EPA is funding two research projects that are to measure the potential impact between low flow rates and waterborne disease outbreaks and other water quality problems. The first with Drexel University is titled “Water Conservation and Water Quality: Understanding the Impacts of New Technologies and New Operational Strategies.” The second, with Purdue, Michigan State and San Jose State, is titled “Right Sizing Tomorrow’s Water Systems for Efficiency, Sustainability, and Public Health.” As indicated during a recent EPA webinar, both projects hypothesize that low flow rates have contributed to water-borne disease outbreaks and other water quality problems in building plumbing systems.

 

PHILADELPHIA TURNS TO GREEN INFRASTRUCTURE TO TACKLE STORMWATER RUNOFF

Rather than spending nearly $10 billion on a new 30-mile-long tunnel, the city is investing an estimated $2.4 billion to construct a network of rain gardens, green roofs, wetlands, and other green infrastructure to reduce combined sewer overflows by 85 percent.

https://www.environmentalleader.com/2018/03/philadelphia-stormwater-runoff/

 

AMERICAN SUPPLY ASSOCIATION POLLS MEMBERS ON NEW TARIFF

A few weeks ago, President Trump alarmed much of the industrialized world with his move to slap tariffs on steel and aluminum imports. ASA heard from many that believed this would harm their business in a big way.

What we didn’t hear was from those that supported these actions. While ASA joined with a wide swath of collective stakeholders expressing our concerns over the tariffs, we wanted to know more of what our membership felt. What we learned was that while this may raise costs, it also is beneficial to increase the demand and capabilities of our domestic manufacturing base.

After surveying our membership, there was no strong tilt toward support or opposition, no consensus on whether this would be bad or good. In fact, according to wholesalers surveyed, 43% support the tariffs, 42% do not support the tariffs and 15% were uncommitted, while almost 100% of manufacturers polled did not support the tariffs.

BETA VERSION OF LEED V4.1 IS AVAILABLE FOR TESTING

The update includes new methodologies for measuring building performance to track energy, water, waste, transportation, and environmental quality.

https://new.usgbc.org/leed-v41

EPA'S 6TH DRINKING WATER INFRASTRUCTURE NEEDS SURVEY AND ASSESSMENT

EPA's 6th Drinking Water Infrastructure Needs Survey and Assessment shows $472.6 billion is needed to maintain and improve the nation’s drinking water infrastructure over the next 20 years. Read the full report here:

EPA's 6th Drinking Water Infrastructure Needs Survey and Assessment (PDF)

EPA’s assessment shows that improvements are primarily needed in:

  • Distribution and transmission: $312.6 billion to replace or refurbish aging or deteriorating pipelines
  • Treatment: $83 billion to construct, expand or rehabilitate infrastructure to reduce contamination
  • Storage: $47.6 billion to construct, rehabilitate or cover water storage reservoirs
  • Source: $21.8 billion to construct or rehabilitate intake structures, wells and spring collectors

 

USGBC ANNOUNCES THE TOP 10 STATES FOR LEED

Massachusetts retained its top position for the second year in a row with 130 LEED certifications representing 4.48 square feet of LEED-certified space per resident. http://x.aspe.org/y.z?l=http%3a%2f%2fnewsroom.usgbc.org%2fus-green-building-council-releases-annual-top-10-states-for-leed-green-building-per-capita%2f&j=324558671&e=3995&p=1&t=h&

 

MORE THAN 5 BILLION PEOPLE WORLDWIDE COULD SUFFER WATER SHORTAGES BY 2050

However, the potential savings of sustainable, nature-based practices could exceed the projected increase in global demand for water, according to the 2018 World Water Development Report. Learn more at: http://www.unwater.org/publications/world-water-development-report-2018/

 

THE SEVEN CITIES LIKELY TO RUN OUT OF WATER IN 10 YEARS

According to the United Nations, via www.waterless.com, more than 1 billion people lack access to fresh, drinkable water. Also, nearly 3 billion people have no access to water at least one month per year.

The UN estimates global demand for water will exceed supply in 2030, meaning more cities will mirror Cape Town, South Africa, which has essentially run out of water.

The following is a list of the seven cities likely to run out of water by 2030:

  1. Sao Paulo, Brazil
  2. Beijing, China
  3. Moscow, Russia
  4. Cairo, Egypt
  5. Mexico City, Mexico
  6. London, England
  7. Miami, Florida

DID YOU KNOW?

Worldwide, almost one in three women and girls do not have access to a toilet.

Although decent sanitation still lacks for 2.3 billion people, prohibiting them from getting an education or supporting their families, simple measures can significantly help females reach their potential and retain dignity, according to "Out of Order: The State of the World's Toilets 2017."


GOOD NEWS STORY: WATERSENSE TO BE FUNDED THROUGH SEPTEMBER 2018

A $1.3 trillion government spending bill signed last month by President Trump instructs the EPA to continue funding WaterSense at 2017 levels and also includes new funds for water quality infrastructure projects.

The 2017 State Scorecard update identified some key trends and notable states:

  • California and Texas both received an “A-,” the highest grades in the country; California and Texas were also the leading states in 2012.
  • Colorado and Illinois have legislatively linked water efficiency requirements for toilets, urinals, showerheads, and other fixtures to the WaterSense standard.
  • Georgia and New York have supplemented their respective state plumbing/building codes with water efficiency requirements for various fixtures that are more stringent than the national standards.
  • Overall, more than half of all states saw their grades improve. Only six states had declines in scores.

Read the full report here:

http://x.aspe.org/y.z?l=https%3a%2f%2fwww.safeplumbing.org%2fnews%2fpmi-press-releases%2farticle%2fpmi-applauds-preservation-of-watersense-increased-water-infrastructure-funding-in-new-federal-budget-package&j=325091489&e=3993&p=1&t=h&

 

BAD NEWS STORY: ADMINISTRATION AGAIN CALLS FOR EPA WATERSENSE PROGRAM'S ELIMINATION IN 2019

The White House has unveiled its Fiscal Year 2019 budget request, and the EPA's WaterSense program is again proposed for elimination. Under the current proposal, the EPA would lose $2.5 billion from its annual budget, a 23% reduction.

 

STATES SCORE A "C" IN WATER EFFICIENCY AND CONSERVATION

According to the 2017 Water Efficiency and Conservation State Scorecard, most states still lack effective laws that advance water efficiency and long-term climate resiliency.

http://x.aspe.org/y.z?l=http%3a%2f%2fwww.allianceforwaterefficiency.org%2fAWE-Releases-State-Scorecard2017.aspx&j=325091489&e=3993&p=1&t=h&

 

ANSI SEEKS FEEDBACK ON POTENTIAL WATER-FOOTPRINT VERIFICATION ACCREDITATION PROGRAM


Input is needed on areas of focus, criteria for quantification and verification, and market demand, among other topics.

https://www.ansi.org/news_publications/news_story?menuid=7&articleid=8218b7c9-c29b-4a9d-a0b9-aadc69479085&source=whatsnew040918

 

REVERSE OSMOSIS EXPERTS ARE ENCOURAGED TO JOIN WQA'S STANDARD DEVELOPMENT WORKING GROUP

ASPE and the Water Quality Association (WQA) are preparing to expand the scope of WQA/ASPE/ANSI S-803 (2017): Sustainable Drinking Water Treatment Systems to include reverse osmosis (RO) systems and membrane components and seek volunteers to assist with drafting the environmental criteria for this additional product category. Individuals interested in joining WQA's Standard Development Working Group for membranes/RO systems should contact WQA Sustainability Certification Manager Stuart Mann at smann@wqa.org

 

VANCOUVER AIMS TO CAPTURE AND CLEAN 90% OF THE CITY'S RAINWATER

The city's Rain City Strategy includes new rainwater management practices that combine green infrastructure with conventional pipe systems. Check out what their plan is at:

http://www.news1130.com/2016/04/18/vancouver-rainwater/

 

REGISTRATION NOW OPEN FOR 11TH ANNUAL WATERSMART INNOVATIONS CONFERENCE AND EXPOSITION (OCT 3-5, 2018)

The WaterSmart Innovations (WSI) Conference and Exposition, the world’s pre-eminent networking and professional event devoted to urban water efficiency, has opened “early bird” registration with special discounted fees in effect through June 1. Sign up at:

https://watersmartinnovations.com/

 

IAPMO PARTICIPATES IN STATE DEPARTMENT FORUM ON WORLD WATER DAY

The IAPMO Group’s international work to ensure safer, more reliable water and sanitation systems was recognized Thursday during the U.S. Department of State’s World Water Day 2018 Forum: Increasing U.S. Private Sector Participation to Achieve Global Water Security.

The morning forum at Washington, D.C.’s Harry S. Truman Building, State Department headquarters, explored how the U.S. government can support increased participation of the American private sector in deploying more sustainable solutions to the world’s most pressing problem — water scarcity.

 

MICHIGAN LEGISLATORS TRY TO WEAKEN BACKFLOW TESTING REQUIREMENTS

The Michigan General Assembly have introduced legislation to weaken the regulations regarding the testing of backflow prevention systems on irrigation system within the state. House Bill number 5754 reads as follows:

“Michigan administrative code must not require the testing of a testable backflow preventer on a residential lawn sprinkler system more often than once every four (4) years after initial installation and testing, unless the backflow preventer has undergone repair since it was last tested or the sprinkler system includes a chemical injection system.”

This bill closely resembles legislation that passed both parts of the Michigan General Assembly several years ago and was vetoed by Governor Snyder. The bill has been referred to the Committee on Natural Resources pending further action.

 IAPMO'S 89TH CONFERENCE HEADS TO PHILADELPHIA

For its 89th annual Education and Business Conference, the International Association of Plumbing and Mechanical Officials (IAPMO) is moving from "The Last Frontier" to the "Athens of America." Attendees last year gathered in Anchorage, Alaska-      this year they'll converge on Philadelphia.

 CONGRESS REAUTHORIZES GEOTHERMAL TAX CREDITS

Congress recently passed legislation to extend federal tax credits for residential and commercial installations of geothermal heat pumps. The measure was included in the Continuing Resolution spending bill recently approved by Congress.

The reinstated GHP tax credits are retroactive to Jan. I, 2017, and extended to Jan. 1, 2022. The language also changes an important consideration for commercial GHP projects, making them eligible if commenced by Jan. 1, 2022 rather than placed in service.


 

  • PLUMBING “DID YOU KNOW?”

 

  • Copper piping, which is the #1 material used for plumbing work in today’s world, is the same material that the Egyptians used to lay their own pipe – some 3000 years ago!
  • Water pipes once used to be made from lead. The word “plumbing” has originated from the Latin word “plumbum,” which means lead.
  • Sir John Harington is credited with inventing the flushable toilet in 1596, hence the American nickname for it, “The John.”
  • Pipes haven't always been made of metal. In the 1800s, both Boston and Montreal used wooden pipes; they were logs that were hollowed out and tapered at the ends

 



 ~Michael Curtright, CPD, LEED, AP, Vice-President, Legislative

                                

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Cole Industrial, Inc.

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Technical Report

 

Looking back 2 years, as I was preparing to take over the Vice President, Technical board position from Frank, I didn’t know what the role would entail. As I reflect on my first term, I am very happy to know that we have been able to continue the tradition of bringing excellent technical presentations every month to our Chapter. As Board members, our first priority is to support our members and provide the learning and development opportunities to help them grow professionally. I will be moving on from my position as AYP representative for our Chapter. I have reached out to all eligible Chapter members, so if you’ve received an email from me and want to know more or get involved, let me know.

 

I would like to thank my fellow Board members for their help getting me up to speed when I took on this role and for covering when I am unable to attend our monthly meetings. I have truly enjoyed working with all of you. I am excited to continue on as the VP Tech and bring new educational content to our Chapter. I am already scheduling for the 2018-2019 meeting so if you have any topics to recommend or a great speaker that visited your office and you want to see present to the group, please let me know!

 

This month our presenter is my fellow Board member Michael Curtwright. Michael will be presenting on the requirements of the new Seattle Energy Code. Michael has worked in the engineering field for over 30 years, beginning as an entry level draftsman, and quickly progressing to the position of ASPE Certified Plumbing Designer. Throughout his career he has held the positions of Estimator, Construction Project Manager, and Senior Plumbing Engineer. Today he retains both CPD and LEED® AP accreditations, and is recognized as an innovator within his industry.

 

 

We are still planning a joint event with the Seattle ASHRAE chapter targeting sometime in fall 2018. We are proposing either a joint general meeting or perhaps a Young Engineers event. If you have any suggestions or are part of both Chapters and want to be involved in the planning, please let me know.

 

A reminder for the end of summer, the 2018 ASPE Convention & Exposition will be held in Atlanta, GA from September 28 – October 3. If you are interested in being a presenter for one of the technical sessions, you can find out more information here: https://www.aspe.org/CallforPresenters

 

I hope everyone has an excellent summer as we take a break from our monthly meetings and newsletters and I am looking forward to seeing everyone at the golf outing in July!

Enjoy the sunshine!!

 

- Jonathan Franzese

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T&S Brass

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JR Smith

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Schott

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